This is your brain on happy: Machine can read your emotions

(Photo: Carnegie Mellon University)

Researchers have figured out how to read your mind and tell whether you are feeling sad, angry or disgusted – all by looking at a brain scan.

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(Source: nbcnews.com)

White House pitches brain mapping project

(Photo: NBC News)

President Obama pitched a human brain research initiative on Tuesday that he likened to the Human Genome Project to map all the human DNA, and said it will not only help find cures for diseases such as Alzheimer’s and autism, but create jobs and drive economic growth.

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This is your brain on exercise

(Photo: Raji Cyrus/UCLA)

Seniors who fit in the most daily physical activity – from raking leaves to dancing – can have more gray matter in important brain regions, researchers reported on Monday.

The scientists have images that show people who were the most active had 5 percent more gray matter than people who were the least active. Having more little gray brain cells translates into a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease, other studies have shown.

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Uncovered photos of Einstein’s brain reveal clues to his genius

(Photo: Falk, Lepore & Noe, 2012, courtesy of the National Museum of Health and Medicine)

Albert Einstein’s brain had extraordinary folding patterns in several regions, which may help explain his genius, newly uncovered photographs suggest.

The photographs, published Nov. 16 in the journal Brain, reveal that the brilliant physicist had extra folding in his brain’s gray matter, the site of conscious thinking.

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Uncovered photos of Einstein’s brain reveal clues to his genius

(Photo: Falk, Lepore & Noe, 2012, courtesy of the National Museum of Health and Medicine)

Albert Einstein’s brain had extraordinary folding patterns in several regions, which may help explain his genius, newly uncovered photographs suggest.

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Creepy critters and cool close-ups: Nikon’s micro-photo contest has it all

(Photo: J. Peters / M. Taylor / St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital)

Top honors in the 2012 Nikon Small World contest go to this confocal 20x view of the blood-brain barrier in a zebrafish embryo. The picture was captured by Jennifer Peters and Michael Taylor of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., and it’s thought to be the first image showing formation of the blood-brain barrier in a live animal.

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Condition makes man’s scalp look like surface of brain

(Photo: New England Journal of Medicine, copyright 2012)

The strange folds and furrows covering a Brazilian man’s entire scalp was neither a funky new look nor a hipster trend. Rather the 21-year-old’s bizarre looking scalp with its deep skin folds in a pattern said to resemble the surface of the brain is a sign of a rare medical condition known as cutis verticis gyrata.